Saturday June 27 8:30 & 1:30 trips

Best day of watching whales so far this season!

Our morning trip was so peaceful, light breeze, not a lot of boat activity, and sea conditions we dream about.

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Our morning Minke enjoying a peaceful morning

 

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Our first Minke sighting was only 7 miles from shore which gave us plenty of time to talk about these “smaller”  whales who don’t always get a lot of attention.  As I have said before they are one of my favorite species.  They dart all around, pop up when you least expect it, and show there pointy heads when they come up, just love them!  In total we had 3 Minke whales, 2 of which were very cooperative, the 3rd sighting was traveling and we never got really close looks.

The afternoon trip could not have been more different!  Many folks ask “when is the best time to see whales?  The honest answer is I’ll let you know in October!  Today was a PERFECT example of how sightings change even in just a matter of hours!

Captain Chris decided to head to the same area we were on our morning trip, keeping fingers crossed we hoped to see our minkes again, but really hoped to see some there species too!  A great decision by our captain and calls from our other whale watching friends.

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Our first Fin whale of the day

The above fin whales dorsal fin is obviously not normal.  Many fin whales have nicks, scars, parts of the dorsal missing. Whales are are the top of the food chain and have a important role in the over all health of the marine environment.  Unfortunately they are highly vulnerable to human activities in the ocean.

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So happy to see a “baby” whale today!

It wasn’t just any “baby”  whale it was “Comet’s”  new 2015 calf!  “Comet” is a very familiar Finback whale.  She was first seen in 1997, making her about 18 years old.  This calf makes # 2 for Comet!  This new calf was so much fun to watch!  It would swim all around us, roll over, ever showing us its tail!  Not something we often see!

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The stark white belly of our baby fin whale, glowing green  against our plankton rich waters

 

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“Comet” and calf

Our amazing day ended with mom and calf in close contact with each other, heading off to only they know where!

Each day we leave the dock with passengers it allows us to collect data on our Gulf of Maine whales, share our data, which in turn becomes a very important tool to help protect and conserve these incredible marine mammals, with out all of you so much important information would not be collected!

On behalf of all the whales in the Gulf of Maine

WE THANK YOU!

Cheers!